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BIGFOOT IN JOHOR? PDF Print E-mail
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Legends, Beliefs and Superstitions
Sunday, 12 June 2011 02:46

 



BIGFOOT IN JOHOR?

As long ago as 1871 sightings of 'Bigfoot' have occurred in Malaya. In recent times, since the 1950s, there have been sightings reported of a black- or brown- furred creature, 2 1/2 metres tall, foraging in the forest and catching fish.

Then in 2005 there was a flurry of excitement throughout Malaysia when it was reported in the media that a small family of these mystery creatures was spotted near the Kinchin River, together with huge footprints, 46 cm long. Authorities in Johor were reported to have launched an expedition to try and find them in 2006.

Known as Orang Mawas in Malaysia (and called the orang utan in Sumatra); this hantu jarang gigi or 'Snaggle-toothed Ghost' is also commonly known in Malaysia as Orang Dalam (meaning “people of the deep forest”), Orang Sanat or Orang Kubu.

The Bigfoot-Giganto theory claims that Bigfoot was probably a pre-historic giant ape which lived during the Middle Pleistocene age, living in several parts of Asia including China and Southeast Asia, as well as North America during ancient times before facing extinction from the earth some 200,000 to 500,000 years ago.

Sightings by several people, including Orang Asli villagers at the 248 million year old Endau-Rompin National Park, may be of the remnants of the Gigantopithecus Blacki ("Giant Ape"). The park, of 48,906 hectares or 800 sq. km and aged 248 million years, is an ancient rainforest, but logging has gone on for many years.

Matters died down with no follow up of late. The claims have been dismissed by many people saying that they were mistaking sun bears for these legendary creatures.

http://www.bigfootencounters.com/articles/update.htm

http://www.cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo-news/johorpixnix/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hlu2nGKvdz4

 

Last Updated on Monday, 13 June 2011 06:31